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Behavioral Psychology, some personal parameters from a professional psychologist
Posted: 12 January 2012 12:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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GAD - 11 January 2012 04:06 PM

That’s like saying that breathing underwater is a non-trivial problem, which hasn’t been sufficiently recognized.

No it isn’t. Look up the Fermi paradox. What I’m proposing is a new explanation of exactly that paradox. Obviously I’m not going to give everything away anonymously on a forum like this. Consider yourself privileged that I’ve told you as much as I have.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 12:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Dennis Campbell - 11 January 2012 04:09 PM

Or, ESP beats EM.  None of which has anything to do with this thread, apart from a wanna-be trying to get on stage.

No, here’s what happened. I made you look like an idiot by tearing to pieces almost every single one of your crappy little parameters. Then you spitefully started to insult me. Then I attempted to defend myself, and you characterize that as “a wanna-be trying to get on stage”.

Evidently you can’t apply the tools of your “profession” to yourself.

[ Edited: 12 January 2012 01:03 AM by JayD ]
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Posted: 12 January 2012 01:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Dennis Campbell - 11 January 2012 04:09 PM
GAD - 11 January 2012 04:06 PM
JayD - 11 January 2012 03:29 PM

I didn’t pull it out of my ass, though. The fact is that EM waves only have a limited range. Haphazardly throwing objects into space also has a limited range. Long distance communication is a non-trivial problem, which hasn’t been sufficiently recognized. Even drawing attention to this problem is an original contribution, more important than anything that Dennis Campbell has posted. Of course, I’m just putting out my idea. I don’t expect anybody to listen. It’s an unfortunate truth that most people require an imprinteur of authority, like a “peer-reviewed study”, before they pay any attention to an idea.

That’s like saying that breathing underwater is a non-trivial problem, which hasn’t been sufficiently recognized.

Or, ESP beats EM.  None of which has anything to do with this thread, apart from a wanna-be trying to get on stage.

With dickwits like jayD it’s best not to give them a stage. And if they insist on ‘performing’ walk out of the auditorium by putting the asshole on ignore like most of us have already.  I have diffuculty remembering when we last had such an arrogant, self-absorbed fool in here.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 07:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Rob, look at the “arrogant, self-absorbed fool” sitting in your own living room.

JayD writes well and seldom engages in ad hominem attacks without substance. You are the polar opposite.

And, as I told you long ago, beer-balls and computer-balls do not make you the tough guy your fuzzy mind thinks you are. Being in good physical shape and trained in fighting does. I guess that leaves you out, doesn’t it?

So, in the only language you can understand, shut the fuck up, you dick… (You fill in the blank.)

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Posted: 12 January 2012 07:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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I notice there’s been another post by our toxic little toad.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 07:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (Rob) - 12 January 2012 07:37 AM

I notice there’s been another post by our toxic little toad.

Just put them on “ignore,” since if you do not, it screws up my filtering process and I get email alerts.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 08:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Dennis Campbell - 12 January 2012 07:46 AM
Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (Rob) - 12 January 2012 07:37 AM

I notice there’s been another post by our toxic little toad.

Just put them on “ignore,” since if you do not, it screws up my filtering process and I get email alerts.

Sorry, Dennis. He is on ignore most of the time. But it’s hard to avoid seeing him in other people’s responses to him becasue they ARE visible even when he’s ignored. And I refuse to let him deter me from a thread. And, anyway, I do sometimes get a laugh from reading him. He’s so nutty. And he has an interesting flair for writing perfectly grammatical sentences (although not always) that are quite meaningless or which have absolutely no connection with reality. In fact, virtually everything he writes is bizzare. Quite rare. And the obvious intensity of his delusions is extraordinary.

If it were not for his grandiosity, his breathtaking arrogance and his endless insults (which in life outside the online forums have no doubt earned him more than a few fat lips) he might be fun to engage. Although, from experience, I know that engaging him would be a pointelss exercise if it were done with any hope of helping him. He will never allow himself to be rescued from superstition and ignorance. The deadly sin of pride has him firmly in its grip and will keep him forever on the dark side.

Alas, poor Mario!

[ Edited: 12 January 2012 09:17 AM by Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (Rob) ]
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Posted: 12 January 2012 08:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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JayD - 12 January 2012 12:51 AM
GAD - 11 January 2012 04:06 PM

That’s like saying that breathing underwater is a non-trivial problem, which hasn’t been sufficiently recognized.

No it isn’t. Look up the Fermi paradox. What I’m proposing is a new explanation of exactly that paradox. Obviously I’m not going to give everything away anonymously on a forum like this. Consider yourself privileged that I’ve told you as much as I have.

Yes it is and no not really. But good luck with that.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 08:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Mario is fond of dogs, so he can’t be that bad. That’s a really cute dog he has in that photo.

I think Dennis Campbell has a picture of himself in his photo. A yapping, insecure terrier who tries to make up for his diminutive stature by compensating with a passive-aggressive personality. No offense to terriers—I wouldn’t want to steretoype you.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 09:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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TheBrotherMario - 12 January 2012 07:25 AM

So, in the only language you can understand, shut the fuck up, you dick… (You fill in the blank.)

This is hilariously pathetic. Oh, how I long for the likes of a Salt Creek whose uncanny gift of language, intelligence and wit, by penetrating barbs, would be able to reduce you to tears and send you scurrying off from here yelping with your tail tucked between your legs, that is, if he was so inclined to even bother with you.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 09:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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TheBrotherMario - 12 January 2012 07:25 AM

And, as I told you long ago, beer-balls and computer-balls do not make you the tough guy your fuzzy mind thinks you are. Being in good physical shape and trained in fighting does. I guess that leaves you out, doesn’t it?

This made me laugh. Since when does being tough in the “real world” as opposed to on a web forum have anything to do with how people act anonymously on the web? As Rob noted, if you speak in real life as you do here, I’m sure you get the crap kicked out of you on a regular basis. Personally speaking, I can be sarcastic and I don’t mind engaging in some virtual sparring on occasion, but just because I spent 20 years in the Army and have 12 years training in jujitsu (with a black belt) does not qualify me to talk trash here more than anyone else. Although I would really enjoy breaking the arms of idiots on occasion, I can’t actually do it so who cares how capable of fighting people really are? Also, I think Dennis mentioned recently that he has a 9mm so no matter how well trained I am or how quickly I can slap a choke on someone, a chest full of lead turns a black belt into a cheap piece of cloth pretty quickly.

Back to the OP…I only have a few undergrad classes in psych and philosophy, so I appreciated your post Dennis.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 09:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Back to the OP…I only have a few undergrad classes in psych and philosophy, so I appreciated your post Dennis.

Any practice of psychology, as a job not a way of life nor some spiritual calling, is faced with the hard, cold realities of insurance issues, legal constraints; liability concerns, quite constraining realities of what person can and cannot do in a voluntary out-patient, face to face situation; the often puzzling problem of trying to figure out “What the problem is,” and may not be as articulated by a patient; one’s own limits of knowledge, etc.  There’s no magic or “mind reading” involved, and often it is a pretty messy, trial and error procedure, albeit that the more knowledge and experience someone has apart from just “formal” training, the more effective one can be, if only modestly so.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 09:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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ChaosRules - 12 January 2012 09:16 AM
TheBrotherMario - 12 January 2012 07:25 AM

And, as I told you long ago, beer-balls and computer-balls do not make you the tough guy your fuzzy mind thinks you are. Being in good physical shape and trained in fighting does. I guess that leaves you out, doesn’t it?

This made me laugh. Since when does being tough in the “real world” as opposed to on a web forum have anything to do with how people act anonymously on the web? As Rob noted, if you speak in real life as you do here, I’m sure you get the crap kicked out of you on a regular basis.

Yes, Chaos. There are no physical fat lips in here to put him in his place. BM acts the tough provocateur in here becasue he knows that the worst that can happen to him is that he’ll be banned. Again! How many times has he been banned so far?  He’s probably had the shit kicked out of him so many times in real life that the only place he feels safe to be himself is in places like this. He gets banned here then goes elsewhere until he’s let back in. Beats getting beat up physically all the time I guess.

Although I don’t always agree with what Dennis’ says, like you, I respect Dennis and appreciate his posts on psychology. It is not a subject that I studied at university so Dennis no doubt has some insights I could benefit from.  Mario will never learn from anyone. But he needs to learn some pretty basic things about social interaction. The fact that he does not learn, refuses to learn, despite all the knocks, is telling. Something ain’t right with him. But, damn it, it is hard to feel sorry for him ain’t it?

[ Edited: 12 January 2012 10:24 AM by Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (Rob) ]
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Posted: 12 January 2012 10:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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Wronganswerer, at least you realize YOU do not possess such language skills.

And your opinions about who truly has the gift of language, intelligence, and wit are of no consequence. But the fact that you mention such things in response to my post belies your thoughts about my writing. Thanks, for the back-door complement.

And calling my post “pathetic” when it was a response in-kind to a vulgar fool, and was prefaced by a caveat, belies the limits of your intellect. You’re welcome, for the self-knowledge.

Something tells me your physical conditioning and overall appearance are more true to the definition of “pathetic” than my single post, especially seeing as how I have wound your pride in your pedestrian and inflated intellect consistently.

Go away, take another med, and find your hero, “Salt Creek”...please!

For I kinda doubt this hero possesses a power greater than spiritual insight—a power that makes language more than “language”; and a power that influences people so deeply that it works despite of words and long after words are forgotten.

This is the power behind the black cloud that floats over your pride-filled head after reading one of my posts pointing out your errors of thought. And you tried to lift this black cloud by giggling like a school boy at a chink in my rhetoric.

Again, you’re welcome.

[ Edited: 12 January 2012 10:13 AM by TheBrotherMario ]
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Posted: 12 January 2012 10:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Sometimes, quite often actually, a psychologist in practice has to resolve conflicts between where s/he “is coming from” and where the patient wants to go.  It is fine to claim the therapist should not impose his or her agenda onto the patient, but that dictum just does not always apply.  I‘ve had patients who sought an evaluation to justify their claim for SSDI “because I’m nervous when I have to work,” or “I was captured in 1944 in the Battle of the Bulge, worked for 44 years as a dentist, but now I have PTSD.”  I denied both.  Generally, unless it is clearly a fraud or illegal, you try and promote what the patient seeks.  Some therapists, in marriage counseling, always sought to promote the marriage, I did not do so, sometimes as defined by the patient, a divorce is the best goal.  I’ve had patients who explicitly sought to learn how to better bilk their clients, as did one attorney referred because he’d done so and got caught; turned him away as well. 

The point of these examples is that regardless of what “School of psychology” one may have, it becomes more a matter of practical applications as well as murky ethical and legal issues.  In some settings, like a prison, it’s a whole different game; you’re an employee of the state, not an advocate of the inmate.  The best resource I had there was other psychologists doing the same work, and we met every day to discuss issues for which there’s no easy answers.

I do see some “ignored” lines popping up here again.  Would be nice if they’d go play somewhere else, but I suppose they’re desperate for whatever attention they can get.

[ Edited: 12 January 2012 10:14 AM by Dennis Campbell ]
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Posted: 12 January 2012 10:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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Dennis Campbell - 12 January 2012 09:36 AM

Back to the OP…I only have a few undergrad classes in psych and philosophy, so I appreciated your post Dennis.

Any practice of psychology, as a job not a way of life nor some spiritual calling, is faced with the hard, cold realities of insurance issues, legal constraints; liability concerns, quite constraining realities of what person can and cannot do in a voluntary out-patient, face to face situation; the often puzzling problem of trying to figure out “What the problem is,” and may not be as articulated by a patient; one’s own limits of knowledge, etc.  There’s no magic or “mind reading” involved, and often it is a pretty messy, trial and error procedure, albeit that the more knowledge and experience someone has apart from just “formal” training, the more effective one can be, if only modestly so.

This is a good point. As interesting as I find psych to be, being a professional in the field cannot be easy. Any time you deal with people, things get screwed up pretty quickly. I am an engineer and project manager, and although I may have the “best” design in the world for a project, the realities of budgets, safety and ethics all must be considered as part of the final offering. Not a great analogy, but just like in your field, experience will go a long way. Wet behind the ears engineers find out very quickly that what they learned in school must be tempered with a number of factors that are never taught.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 10:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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TheBrotherMario - 12 January 2012 10:10 AM

Wronganswerer, at least you realize YOU do not possess such language skills.

Few do, that’s why I referenced him. Most definitely not you.

And your opinions about who truly has the gift of language, intelligence, and wit are of no consequence. But the fact that you mention such things in response to my post belies your thoughts about my writing. Thanks, for the back-door complement.

Don’t flatter yourself. You’re undeserving of any complements and to think I have issued you one through any door is just as delusional as your religious experience. I was comparing him to me, not to you. You’re a mental and spiritual midget, Mario ... make that amoeba. Frankly, he probably would not have even bothered with you, as I mentioned.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 10:29 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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ChaosRules - 12 January 2012 10:16 AM
Dennis Campbell - 12 January 2012 09:36 AM

Back to the OP…I only have a few undergrad classes in psych and philosophy, so I appreciated your post Dennis.

Any practice of psychology, as a job not a way of life nor some spiritual calling, is faced with the hard, cold realities of insurance issues, legal constraints; liability concerns, quite constraining realities of what person can and cannot do in a voluntary out-patient, face to face situation; the often puzzling problem of trying to figure out “What the problem is,” and may not be as articulated by a patient; one’s own limits of knowledge, etc.  There’s no magic or “mind reading” involved, and often it is a pretty messy, trial and error procedure, albeit that the more knowledge and experience someone has apart from just “formal” training, the more effective one can be, if only modestly so.

This is a good point. As interesting as I find psych to be, being a professional in the field cannot be easy. Any time you deal with people, things get screwed up pretty quickly. I am an engineer and project manager, and although I may have the “best” design in the world for a project, the realities of budgets, safety and ethics all must be considered as part of the final offering. Not a great analogy, but just like in your field, experience will go a long way. Wet behind the ears engineers find out very quickly that what they learned in school must be tempered with a number of factors that are never taught.

Well, put it this way, one does not make a ton of money at it.  Industrial/organization psychologists are the highest paid of the many APA divisions.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 10:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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ChaosRules - 12 January 2012 10:16 AM
Dennis Campbell - 12 January 2012 09:36 AM

Back to the OP…I only have a few undergrad classes in psych and philosophy, so I appreciated your post Dennis.

Any practice of psychology, as a job not a way of life nor some spiritual calling, is faced with the hard, cold realities of insurance issues, legal constraints; liability concerns, quite constraining realities of what person can and cannot do in a voluntary out-patient, face to face situation; the often puzzling problem of trying to figure out “What the problem is,” and may not be as articulated by a patient; one’s own limits of knowledge, etc.  There’s no magic or “mind reading” involved, and often it is a pretty messy, trial and error procedure, albeit that the more knowledge and experience someone has apart from just “formal” training, the more effective one can be, if only modestly so.

This is a good point. As interesting as I find psych to be, being a professional in the field cannot be easy. Any time you deal with people, things get screwed up pretty quickly. I am an engineer and project manager, and although I may have the “best” design in the world for a project, the realities of budgets, safety and ethics all must be considered as part of the final offering. Not a great analogy, but just like in your field, experience will go a long way. Wet behind the ears engineers find out very quickly that what they learned in school must be tempered with a number of factors that are never taught.

Ah, engineering! Another wonderful science. To be able to put things together that will do the job required and not disintegrate or fall out of the sky. Now that is something real. Something that matters in this life. How I wish I could have studied science! Law is so UN-real. It’s more like religion or philosophy than like science. If conciousness, like anything else, is ever to be really understood, it will only be though science and not philosophy.

[ Edited: 12 January 2012 11:08 AM by Die fröhliche Wissenschaft (Rob) ]
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Posted: 12 January 2012 11:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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To be fair Rob, my field of study was engineering physics. Although we did cover a lot of material that resulted in something real (nuclear engineering, semi conductors, super conductors, lasers), there was also a heavy focus on quantum physics and quantum mechanics. I have not touched any of those topics since I graduated, so although I still have a personal interest in quantum theory (and chaos theory, as befitting my moniker), I have forgotten almost everything I did in school. These days, I manage projects at an industrial facility, so lots of piping, pumps, pressure vessels and the like. These things certainly matter but they only have an indirect link to my degree. Cheers.

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Posted: 12 January 2012 11:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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piping, pumps, pressure vessels

Sounds right up my alley. LOL

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Posted: 12 January 2012 01:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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Dennis Campbell - 12 January 2012 10:29 AM

Well, put it this way, one does not make a ton of money at it.  Industrial/organization psychologists are the highest paid of the many APA divisions.

You don’t deserve a ton of money. If we switched you around with a psychiatrist impersonator who knows a few lines like “Tell me how you feel”, but only has minimal knowledge of psychiatry, would the patient really be able to tell the difference? I doubt it. Would there be any significant difference in cure rate? I see no evidence of that.

[ Edited: 12 January 2012 01:19 PM by JayD ]
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Posted: 12 January 2012 07:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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JayD - 12 January 2012 01:13 PM
Dennis Campbell - 12 January 2012 10:29 AM

Well, put it this way, one does not make a ton of money at it.  Industrial/organization psychologists are the highest paid of the many APA divisions.

You don’t deserve a ton of money. If we switched you around with a psychiatrist impersonator who knows a few lines like “Tell me how you feel”, but only has minimal knowledge of psychiatry, would the patient really be able to tell the difference? I doubt it. Would there be any significant difference in cure rate? I see no evidence of that.

JayD, your input to this thread has only been abusive toward Dennis and the ways he describes things in his field. It has shed no light whatsoever on any subject related to the OP, in my opinion. The above post, for instance, communicates nothing but blatant yet empty harassment. I’d like to see you get booted off this forum once again for this sort of posting, whether permanently or just temporarily. I doubt if anyone reading your words gets a kick out of your unwarranted aggression. Do you arrive at comfort by being seen as an aggressive and angry jerk by most everyone who reads your filth? Or are you imagining others silently cheering you on with your abusiveness?

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Posted: 13 January 2012 12:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 49 ]
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ChaosRules - 12 January 2012 11:03 AM

I manage projects at an industrial facility, so lots of piping, pumps, pressure vessels and the like. These things certainly matter but they only have an indirect link to my degree. Cheers.

Me too! I worked for Swan Hunter on the Tyne designing war ships, then for Vicoma International, designing oil retrieval equipment for Al Jubail, industrial city .
All before I changed into the Social Worker I am today. Glad I changed direction, much less of a head bust for me I must say.

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All right, no one is to stone ANYONE until I blow this whistle! Even… and let me make this absolutely clear… even if they do say “Jehovah”!

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Posted: 13 January 2012 06:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 50 ]
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In forty years, I have seen 3 psychologists and was helped from each of them.  I was a Psych minor, so I knew the difference between the basic approaches to therapy. The first one was an Existential Psychologist.  These are not easy to find, but I managed.  Together, we decided that misery is part of the human condition, so stop whining.  The second one was a Cognitive Therapist.  He taught me that if you relaxed your mouth muscles, you can relax your whole body. This has been extremely helpful to me throughout my life The third was a Jungian-type and we talked about God and philosophy. I liked him because he was sweet.  I saw none of these guys for more than 5 sessions because…..well, I figured out that they didn’t know much more than I did and they reinforced what I already knew rather than challenged my presumptions.  If I had any sense, I would have gone to a therapist who didn’t match up with my “needs”, which would have forced me to look at myself and my circumstances from a different angle. 

My tenant and her daughter are having major problems in their relationship and are both seeing psychologists.  On separate occasions, the mother and daughter each confided to me that, with help from therapy, they figured out that the other one was suffering from “clinical narcissism”  Of course, this pleased them because they recognized that they themselves were not the problem, so it was simply a matter of learning how to interact with a crazy person.  I was ALMOST tempted to put them together in a room and confront them with their mutual diagnosis because it would have been so entertaining, but…nah…..it is best to remain uninvolved if one is a landlady and a rent check is anticipated. 

My point is that, whether recognized or not, therapists who do private counseling have a vested interest in keeping their patients “happy” with the therapy they are receiving, and therefore seldom say anything truly provocative which might make their patients even temporarily disturbed by their own behavior.  It’s well known that if you point out a character flaw, most people respond with anger.  Psychologists can’t afford to alienate their customers, patients don’t want to pay someone to criticize them (they want to be nurtured and sympathized with),  so the whole interaction can become fraudulent.  Of course, I’m generalizing, but this is the main weakness I see in psychotherapy. 

But, I guess everyone needs a friend, even if they have to pay to get one, so I guess it serves its purpose.

You know…I’ve considered going to see an atheist psychologist to help me resolve my “heart vs head” religious issues, but, you know what?  I really don’t want anyone to encourage me into becoming an atheist, so maybe I’ll talk to a priest.  See what I mean?

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